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Archive for the ‘Author Alert’ Category

On Friday March 4th, at 7pm, author Yann Martel will be reading at Changing Hands Bookstore from his latest book Beatrice and Virgil.

Yann Martel is the author of The New York Times best selling book Life of Pi. In 2002, Martel was the recipient of the Mann Booker Prize for Life of Pi.  He was also shortlisted for the 2001 Governor General’s Award for Fiction and was Winner of the 2001-2003 Asian/Pacific American Award for Literature.

His new book, Beatrice and Virgil, is an allegorical tale of representations of the Holocaust. The book follows novelist Henry as he receives a script for a play. He traces the play back to a taxidermist who introduces him to the play’s protagonists, a donkey and a monkey, named Beatrice and Virgil.

For more information about Yann Martel you can visit his author page at http://www.randomhouse.ca/newface/martel.php.

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As part of Project Humanities launch week festivities, they will be holding an event at the Tempe Center for the Arts on Monday, February 7th at 7 pm.  The keynote speaker for the event will be author, poet and screenwriter Sherman Alexie and he will speak on the topic “People, Places and Stories.”

Alexie, currently residing in Seattle Washington, bases much of his writing on his experiences as a Native American. Some of his best known works are a book of short stories entitled The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven (1994), the film Smoke Signals, and The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, an autobiographical novel for young adults.

In 1999, Alexie was named as one of the New Yorker’s top twenty writers of the twenty first century. In 2007, Alexie was awarded the National Book Award prize for Young People’s literature for The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian. Last year Alexie won the PEN/Faulkner Award for War Dances, the Native Writers’ Circle of the Americas Lifetime Achievement Award, and was the recipient of the Puterbaugh Award and holds the distinction of being the first American to receive the award.

The event takes place February 7th at 7 pm at the Tempe Center for the Arts located at 700 W. Rio Salado Parkway Tempe, AZ. 8528. Parking is free for guests in the lot adjacent to the facility. No tickets are needed for this event; seating is on a first come first serve basis. Guests may arrive at 6:00 p.m. and doors to the theater will open at 6:30 p.m.

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At Superstition Review, we like to update our readers about upcoming literary events in the Phoenix area. On Friday November 5th at 7 pm, Sam Harris will visit Changing Hands Bookstore. Sam Harris’ work has appeared in Newsweek, The New York Times, The Los Angeles Times, The Atlantic and others. His other books include The End of Faith and Letter to a Christian Nation. Harris is also CEO and Co-Founder of Project Reason, a group devoted to spreading scientific knowledge and secular values.

At the reading on Friday Sam Harris will be discussing his most recent New York Times bestseller entitled The Moral Landscape: How Science Can Determine Human Values. The controversial nature of his writing has challenged what readers believe as the line between science and morality fades. Because of the heated debate, his work has been discussed in over 15 languages in publications such as TIME, Scientific American, Nature and other journals.

Sam Harris’ website, http://www.samharris.org/, features assorted media about his publications as well as a recommended readings list. Books on this list purchased through his website generate a 7 percent return for his charitable foundation, Project Reason. A few of the recommended texts include Meditations by Marcus Aurelius, Thinking and Deciding by Jonathan   Baron and The Diving Bell and the Butterfly by J.D, Bauby. For more information on Changing Hands Bookstore and their visiting writers you can check out their website at http://changinghands.com/.

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Superstition Review featured Claire McQuerry’s poetry in Issue 2. I recently had the good fortune to discuss her soon to be published collection of poetry entitled Lacemakers. Claire earned her MFA in writing poetry and taught for several years at Arizona State University. Her work has been published in Double Change, Comstock Review and elsewhere. Her poetry collection Lacemakers will be published in December 2011 as the winner of the 2010 Crab Orchard Series in Poetry First Book Award.

1. How has your life changed since your time teaching at Arizona State University?

I took a year off from teaching and worked as a freelance writer, which was enough time for me to realize that I’m much more at home in the academic environment than most other workplaces. I love teaching, and I love being surrounded by colleagues who care about literature and learning. So I’m back in school now, working on a PhD at the University of Missouri, where I’m also teaching and working as the Contest Editor at the Missouri Review.

2. What experiences have you taken away from your work at The Missouri Review?

I’ve never been very good with technology and social medias, but part of my job as Contest Editor involves networking to publicize our annual Editor’s Prize competition—so I’ve been learning to use Twitter and to keep up with regular blog posts and follow other journals and literary news online. The move that many journals are making to digital formats, the growing digital book trend, the widespread use of Twitter, etc. are changes I’ve been resistant for a long time, but it seems that that’s the direction things are headed—even in the literary world, which is so slow to change—so I think it’s good that I’m getting to know the online publishing environment better.

3. How is working with The Missouri Review different from other writing you’ve done?

I guess I touched on that a bit in the previous question. There’s a level of self-consciousness I’ve had to overcome when I blog or “tweet” for TMR because I’m aware of the very public and immediate nature of that writing. When I write poetry or essays for publication, part of that process always involves honing each piece through numerous revisions until I’m satisfied that the rough edges have been smoothed away, that the work that remains is well-reflected-upon and carefully crafted. This usually requires me to put a draft away for a while and then revisit it after some time has elapsed. Clearly, this level of reflection isn’t possible with online communication, so I’m adapting to a new form.

4. Besides your work at The Missouri Review, what are you currently working on?

Teaching and finishing coursework for my degree. Writing more poems when I can.

5. For those who are not familiar with your newly published book, how would you describe Lacemakers?

I wrote most of the poems for Lacemakers while living in Phoenix, so a good portion of the book questions the effect a city has on the people who live in it: the poems explore questions of relationship, of loss and longing, and of environment—particularly the man-made environment and its impact on the people who inhabit it. Lacemakers also returns obsessively to separations, which is something I became keenly aware of while living in Phoenix—the way people can live side-by-side and yet remain incredibly isolated.

6. When did you begin writing Lacemakers, and when was it completed?

I wrote the oldest poem in the collection in 2002, and the most recent poem was written about a year ago, so I guess that covers a span of seven years. The early poems have undergone so many revisions that they don’t look much like their first versions.

7. What advice would you offer to an aspiring writer?

Well, it may sound obvious, but it’s the best advice I got from my mentors when I first started writing, and it’s still the best I can offer anyone else: read. Read widely and often—both authors who have a similar style to your own as well as those who challenge you or have a different aesthetic. A poem (or an essay or story) is always a response. You’ll find that your poems are richer and your mind is fuller of the poems you want to write if you feed yourself a steady diet of other writers’ work. I only wish that I hadn’t waited so long in life to listen to this advice myself!

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While awaiting responses from solicited writers of fiction, poetry, and nonfiction, Superstition Review Section Editors are dedicating their time this week to reading and organizing incoming submissions via Submishmash. Go to http://superstitionreview.submishmash.com/submit for our submission guidelines and to see our new submissions manager. Our Art Editors have visited exhibits locally and elsewhere, and are now communicating with hopeful incoming artists.

Also this week, Superstition Review Reading Series Editor Mary Richardson has confirmed that we will feature Melissa Pritchard at our Superstition Review reading this semester. Date and venue will be announced soon.

Check back regularly for updates on our highly anticipated reading, and other Superstition Review updates.

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Don’t forget, Superstition Review’s Reading Series kicks off this Monday, September 21, at 7:00PM, held at Changing Hands Bookstore! The reading will feature some exciting names, including Rita Ackerman, Annie Lopez, and Stella Pope Duarte.

Former intern for SR, Veronica Martinez, interviewed Stella for Superstition Review last semester about her newest published book, If I Die in Juarez, for issue 3. It’s with great excitement, then, that we announce that this very book has been awarded an American Book Award for 2009. This is a prestigious award given to an author who accomplishes diversity in the literary community, presented by other writers.

A lot of the interns will be in attendance so don’t forget to say hi if you see us, we’d be happy to talk to you. We will also be live-tweeting at the event so, if you can’t make it, you can stay up-to-the minute with the event on our Twitter account (add us!).

Come on down to Changing Hands, at 6428 S McClintock Dr, Tempe, 85283, at the southwest corner of McClintock Dr and Guadalupe, to hear one of this year’s American Book Award winners and her accomplished students celebrate the first reading of the SR Reading Series!

Stella Pope Duarte’s Official Homepage

Changing Hands Bookstore

Superstition Review on Twitter

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Chris Crutcher, notable young adult novelist and former family therapist, is going to be making a stop in the valley to give a lecture in a couple weeks as a way to kick off Banned Books Week (Septmber 26-October 3).

Chandler-Gilbert Community College, located at 2626 E Pecos Rd
Chandler, 85225
, will be hosting Chris for his lecture titled, “Banned: When Real Life Fiction Meets the Censor.” The lecture will be held at 9:40AM-11:05AM on Monday, September 28, in CGCC’s Performing Arts Center (PAC building) on the Pecos campus.

Having been challenged and banned numerous times for his own writing, Chris is a strong advocate for freedom of fiction and is constantly participating in freedom of fiction events. Particularly because he has experienced tough stories as a counsellor, and he knows that life is not always easy especially for young adults, he challenges bannings of his books quite often – he not only argues for the books to be allowed to be printed, but he also argues that banning is belittling real-life situations and disallowing young readers to connect to the books they read.

We hope you can make it to this free event!

Chris Crutcher’s Office Homepage

Chandler-Gilbert Community College Campus Map

CGCC’s Event Page

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